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Mid-Century Modern Style Homes for Sale

Search Mid-Century Modern Homes for Sale Dallas Texas

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Photo of Listing #13673617

9741 Bellewood Drive, Dallas, TX - $439,000

Residential, Single Family
  • 3 Beds
  • 2 Baths
  • 1,886 SQFT
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A Rare Opportunity To Own A Three Bedroom, Two Bath Mid Century Modern In Sought After White Rock Elementary. Front Elevation Features A Metal Bris De Soliel Surrounding A Courtyard And Pond. Interior Boasts Large Living Area Framed By Picture Win...

Photo of Listing #13667830

1327 Bar Harbor Drive, Dallas, TX - $449,000

Residential, Single Family
  • 4 Beds
  • 4.1 Baths
  • 3,496 SQFT
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This Mid-century Masterpiece Designed By Architect John Thompson Has Been Gracefully Transitioned To Embrace The Admired Design Of The Era. Due To The Authenticity It Was Featured On The 42nd Old Oak Cliff Conservation League Home Tour 2015. Stunn...

Photo of Listing #13673078

1526 Oates Drive, Dallas, TX - $389,900

Residential, Single Family
  • 3 Beds
  • 2 Baths
  • 1,545 SQFT
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Fantastic Mid-century Modern Home With Modern Updates And Finishes Throughout. Tastefully Maintaining Its Original Mcm Design. Light And Bright, There Is A Feeling You Are Entering A House Nestled In Palm Springs The Moment You Open The Door. Upda...

Photo of Listing #13669144

6211 W Northwest Highway G115, Dallas, TX - $350,000

Residential, Condominium
  • 1 Bed
  • 1 Bath
  • 861 SQFT
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One Of Preston Tower’s Finest: This First Floor, 1 Bedroom Unit Was Taken Down To The Concrete, Framed In Metal Studs, & Made Over In March 2017. Each Space Was Reconfigured Including: Kitchen, Living, Office, Expanded Master Closet, A Utility Clo...

Photo of Listing #13671078

4616 W Lovers Lane 105, Dallas, TX - $179,900

Residential, Condominium
  • 2 Beds
  • 2 Baths
  • 1,026 SQFT
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Mid-century Modern Condo Located In The Bluffview Area. Ground Floor With Pool View And A Large Rear Open Yard . Totally Renovated In 2007 With Engineered Wood Floors, Granite Counters And Stainless Steel Appliances. Also Includes Full Size Sta...

Photo of Listing #13670141

910 W Colorado Boulevard, Dallas, TX - $1,295,000

Residential, Single Family
  • 3 Beds
  • 2.1 Baths
  • 3,910 SQFT
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Grab Your Rat Pack, Your Cool Cats, Your Hipsters, And Sweet Dollies. Mid Century Modern Like You Have Not Seen Before. On An Acre Of Heaven, A Powerful Reinvention That Dramatically Embraces Both Classic And New. For The Mcm Enthusiast, An Archit...

10443 Cromwell Drive, Dallas, TX - $419,900

Residential, Single Family
  • 3 Beds
  • 2 Baths
  • 2,179 SQFT
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Gorgeous Renovated Home Adjacent To Sparkman Club. Open Floor Concept With New Hardwood Floors In Living Areas And Tile And Quartz Counters In Wet Areas. All New Ss Appliances With Upscale Drawer Style Microwave And Brushed Nickle Fixtures Through...

7023 Allview Lane, Dallas, TX - $279,000

Residential, Single Family
  • 3 Beds
  • 2 Baths
  • 1,955 SQFT
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Adorable Ranch Style Home Minutes Away From White Rock Lake & Downtown Dallas. Tastefully Renovated Home Features Light And Bright Interiors 3 Bedrooms And 2 Baths. Comfortable Floor Plan And A Large Den With Gas Fireplace And Wet Bar. Office Bon...

652 Bizerte Avenue, Dallas, TX - $328,000

Residential, Single Family
  • 3 Beds
  • 2 Baths
  • 2,122 SQFT
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Exciting Opportunity In Desirable Wynnewood North, Known For Its Gently Roiling Terrain, Large Lots & 2 Private Lakes! Remarkable Mid-century Design Features Perfect Floorplan For Entertaining. 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Formal Living & Dining Rooms, P...

Photo of Listing #13664145

5338 Emerson, Dallas, TX - $1,245,000

Residential, Single Family
  • 4 Beds
  • 3 Baths
  • 3,253 SQFT
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Stunning Modern Dwelling By A. Gruppo Architecture. Beautifully Situated In Lush Greenway Crest, Mins From Inwood Village & Highland Park Village. Quality Crafted Hm Feat. Bright Open Spaces, Tall Ceiling,seamless Connectivity To The Outdoors And ...

4706 Ridgeside Drive, Dallas, TX - $679,000

Residential, Single Family
  • 4 Beds
  • 3.1 Baths
  • 3,438 SQFT
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Updated Mid-century Modern With Pool & Yard. Detached Guest Quarters, Approximately 337 Sq. Feet; Vaulted Ceiling, Full Bath, Closet, Slate Floor, Small Minibar With Sink & Refrigerator, And Room For Microwave. Three-car Garage. Situated In The Ce...

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Listing information last updated on August 16th, 2017 at 10:31pm CDT.

Overview

Mid-Century Modern homes for sale in Dallas are spread about the city. But, there are a lot of Dallas TX Mid-Century Modern real estate listings in the Northwest Dallas and North Dallas areas in particular. This style of architecture was prevalent in Dallas from approximately the 1950's thru the early 1970's. Therefore, buyers seeking this particular style will most likely find their homes in areas where the properties were constructed during this era - i.e. Northwest & North Dallas.

Dallas Mid-Century Modern Homes Statistics

Total Dallas Mid-Century Modern Homes for Sale: 33
Average Dallas Mid-Century Modern Homes Price: $890,842
Highest Dallas Mid-Century Modern Homes Price: $5,500,000
Lowest Dallas Mid-Century Modern Homes Price: $179,900

Mid-Century Modern Homes in Dallas TX


When we consider the style of something, we all describe it differently. Style has several meanings, some of which are perceptive in nature. We think about certain styles of homes, for example, in relation to our part of the country, our lifestyle or our taste in architecture. If you asked three people what mid-century modern homes were like, one would answer “the Beaver Cleaver homes of the 50s”, one would answer “A-frame houses”, and the other would answer “the Brady Bunch or the Partridge Family houses”. They would all be right and then some. This particular style embraced openness, closeness to nature, acute angles, lots (and lots) of glass, natural materials and more.

Where to Find Mid-Century Modern Real Estate in Dallas


Most Mid-Century Modern homes can be found in the following areas of Dallas: Kessler Park, Stevens Park, North Oak Cliff, East Dallas, and Northwest Dallas.

What Makes Them Mid-Century Homes?


It’s an odd thing to say, but Nazi Germany gave America a few gifts. One of them was running off some of their greatest architects: Walter Gropius, Mies van der Rohe and Marcel Breuer. Other notable European architects included Austrians Rudolph Schindler and Richard Neutra as well as  Swiss-born William Lescaze. Naturally, these eminent professionals brought with them an international flavor that began to show up in home designs all across the country. Frank Lloyd Wright taught many of them, and the others taught at Harvard and Chicago.

What makes them mid-century modern is the perception. Shape, angles and windows combined to give such a house an aura of room to grow.  Soldiers were coming home. They picked their lives back up, had families, took up a trade and sought healthy happy lives. The perception manifested in large open floor plans. Windows graced every wall of the house, often floor-to-ceiling in size. Slanting roofs covered rooms leading out to a carport. Often parts of the house were cantilevered over other parts. Ceilings were left bare to show the ceiling timbers, wood support beams became a thing of beauty, and natural stone fireplaces and hardwood floors became “the” thing. Built-ins made the best use of available space.

About the Architecture of Mid-Century Real Estate


Mid-century modern homes came in different interpretations. European designers brought the international design to America. It encompassed flat roofs, metal windows (often casement windows) and absolutely no ornamentation. The look was clean lines, openness and no carving on doors, windows or eaves. Contemporary, on the other hand, embraced the same clean lines. They were defined by windows, wood, brick and natural stone. Innovations in sloping roof lines, recessed parts of the structure and steps leading up to verandas wrapping around the house defined contemporary mid-century modern housing. Organic houses were interpreted by some designers to be superior to geometrical shapes, bricks and stone. These houses were often cantilevered over cliffs and naturally occurring rock formations, rivers and other water scapes. They featured less stringent lines and were sometimes round. A-frame houses became popular about this time, with roof lines extending from midway to all the way to the ground. Glass put the inhabitants closer to the nature surrounding them than the other styles of houses.

Here we would like to introduce Joseph Eichler, a green grocer with a better idea. He’d seen one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s new “usonian” (for United States of North America) homes; he decided they were a good idea, so he began to produce them. These “Eichlers” featured multiple methods of bringing the outside in while being affordable for the average American. This guy didn’t mess around bringing the outside in; you step outside your new “Eichler” right into the pool or onto the garden-surrounded patio. His designs are just now being rediscovered and reproduced across the country.

Lifestyles of the Mid-Century Modern Homes


Each decade has given us something to celebrate. In the 50s, it was the end of the war and burgeoning prosperity. The mid-century modern home was wide open with space to pack in books, the new music coming out of Memphis, the new televisions and so much more. Times were good. New dances were practiced on the hardwood floors of every room in the house, it seemed because the rooms were so open and big.

The 60s brought us even more exciting new music. Television morphed into the comedy variety hour; soap operas came off the radio and took up residence on the new nine-inch screens; our national leaders now had faces instead of just their voices on a radio. Unrest was brewing abroad, and the country prepared for unpleasantness. We gathered on porches and in yards to discuss it with neighbors and friends while watching out for the children through all that glass.

We surely don’t have enough room to reminisce about the 70s here. Music, books, movies, television, cars, clothes (remember polyester leisure suits?), rapid transit and so much more bombarded our consciousness. Every place we turned was something new, something fast or something loud. Those open floor plans hosted parties for more than just birthdays. New businesses, new friends and sometimes parties for no reason at all occurred both outside and in simultaneously. For about 30 years, hope and the security of prosperity hung like an aura over mid-century modern homes.

Here is where the term mid-century modern generally ends. Most put it at 1975 or 1980. Other types of architecture, innovations in materials, colors and styles take us into the next chapter. The lifestyle of mid-century is being actively sought today by those wanting those open spaces again, by those wanting original natural materials, angles, glass and sloping roof lines.

All Real Estate for Sale in Dallas, Texas

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